How To Sell Your Organization To A Candidate In An Interview

November 28th, 2014

One of the biggest challenges a company faces during a job interview is pitching the company in an attractive way to a “dream” candidate. The candidate obviously has some level of interest in your company since he or she has submitted a resume and has accepted a job interview, but you need to make the final push. We will discuss how to sell your company to the candidate, without seeming too desperate to get the candidate on board.

Clarity about the Role is Important

You need to be as clear as possible when discussing or describing role for which the candidate is interviewing. You cannot leave out any details, nor make any mistakes in describing what the candidate would be doing during a normal workday. All of this information will play a role in the decision the candidate makes as to whether or not he or she will accept an offer of employment. Another way to show clarity is by giving the candidate a tour of the company when arriving, during the interview, or on the way out the door at the conclusion of the interview.

Think about the Competition

As you sit down with a candidate, effective recruiting means you need to take into consideration your company’s competition. If you want to be successful in selling your company to a candidate, you must acknowledge that these candidates could be interviewing with the competition in the near future. You will need to provide them with incentives to join your organization. These include better compensation, a strong benefits package or better schedule flexibility.

Think about the Candidate

Another way you can sell the company to the candidate is by thinking like the candidate. Put yourself in the candidate’s shoes. Figure out what it is he or she will want from such a job at your company. This includes strong autonomy, a clear path to advancement, job security and recognition for strong performance. You can determine all of this by asking the candidate about their expectations, hopes, values and work style.

Describe the Outstanding Culture

Candidates want to know what type of culture the company has so they can determine if he or she will fit into that environment. If your company has a very positive culture, you need to explain it and show the candidate why the culture is so positive. This can be done by showing the candidate around the office on varying occasions.

Demonstrate Genuine Passion

Even though you are conducting the job interview, you still need to display passion for your company as a part of effective recruiting. If you are not passionate about the job and the culture of your workplace, then the candidate will not feel compelled to accept an offer of employment. Passion shows the candidate what is alluring about the position and what the company can bring to the table.

If you follow the tips outlined above, it should not be difficult to sell the candidate on your company during a job interview. If you need help coming up with ways to highlight the company strengths or in finding a well-matched candidate — consider working with Davis Staffing in Hammond Indiana.

How To Turn Temporary Hires Into Permanent Ones

November 14th, 2014

Even though your company brings in Temp to Perm Hires every so often, it does not mean they must absolutely be let go once their contract comes to an end. You have a couple of options; renew their temporary contract for another set period or hire the employee to the full-time staff. It is very easy to turn temporary hires into permanent ones and we will show you how.

Use a Staffing Firm

The first step you need to take in the process is partnering with a staffing firm to find the right Temp to Perm Hires for your open jobs. The staffing firm will handle the application process, the interviews and the paperwork. You will only need to introduce yourself and train the new temp worker when the time comes for them to start the job.

Watch the Temp Worker

The second step is to watch how the temp worker performs. Never make it known that the worker has been chosen to be hired full-time, or has the possibility of being hired full-time because it might cause them to change their work ethic. You want to see how well the temp worker will perform without any expectations.

If they come to work each day knowing their contract will be up in two weeks or two months, yet still work their hardest, complete projects on-time, provide leadership in the office, then you know you have an excellent employee on your books.

Determine the Need for Another Full-Time Employee

Your next step in using Temp to Perm Hires is to determine if your company truly needs another full-time employee. You will need to crunch numbers and determine a budget for another full-time position, which will include salary, benefits and a possible signing bonus.

You also need to take a look at the workload of your current full-time staff. Will adding another full-time employee help them complete work quicker, of higher quality and prevent burnout? If even one of these answers is yes, then you need to begin the onboarding process right now.

Offer the Full-time Spot

Now that you have determined that a temporary worker should be added to your full-time staff, you need to begin the process of onboarding the employee. This includes offering the job permanently to the employee, having them sign the paperwork, putting them through any additional training or introductory meetings required.

Reap the Rewards

Now it is time to sit back and reap the rewards of hiring your temp worker full-time. You were able to analyze how they performed, determine if it is worth it to bring them on permanently and now you can watch how they respond to having a full-time, permanent job with your company.

Should You Hire On Experience Or Potential?

October 29th, 2014

Working as a hiring manager is challenging and rewarding all at the same time. Each time you make an excellent hire, you get to watch first-hand how well the employee performs on the job. A hot topic within the industry right now is if you should hire on experience or potential when bringing in new employees. We will discuss why the answer should be potential and not hire based on experience.

Is the Candidate Fresh?

One of the first things you need to look at during the job interview is if the candidate is fresh or stale. When we compare fresh versus stale we are talking about right out of school and working the same job for 20 years. Sometimes, a candidate who is a recent college graduate will offer more to the company than someone who has been working the job for 20 or more years.

Does the Candidate Have Staying Power?

The next question you need to ask yourself when analyzing a candidate is if they have staying power at your organization. Is the candidate a flash in the pan? Did they accomplish one major thing during their career? If so, he or she might not be able to replicate the success when working at your company. A candidate with staying power will be able to work under the radar while being successful during the length of their career.

Is the Candidate Open to New Things?

A candidate who is stuck in their ways will fall into the experience category and you should stay away from hiring such a person. You want someone who is open to new things, especially as technology keeps evolving. You will need to determine if the candidate tries new things by asking questions that tell you if he or she is a risk-taker.

Is the Candidate Still Learning?

If the job candidate is on cruise control, then he or she might not be a good hire for your company. If the candidate is still furthering their education, is attending training courses, or asks about tuition reimbursement, he or she is the right fit for your company. This type of employee fits into the category of hire for potential.

Traits of Potential-Based Candidates

What are some of the traits of a potential-based hire? The traits you want to look for the most include insight, curiosity, determination and engagement. When you hire based on potential, the candidate you choose should have at least two of these traits. If you come across a candidate who has three or more of the traits, you need to make the best offer possible to secure a signature on the employment contract.

The bottom line here is that you should always hire based on potential and not experience because potential will bring more success to your company than someone who is stuck in their ways.

What To Look For In A Candidate Fresh Out Of School?

October 14th, 2014

As an employer, you need to do everything possible to find the right candidate for the open jobs at your company. This means that you will need to know what to look for in the candidates who interview for the open jobs. The student’s GPA and major are not the only thing you need to take into consideration when hiring recent college graduates.

We have compiled a list of the most important things to look for in a candidate fresh out of school here.

A Team Player

The candidate must be a team player. You will want an employee who not only can work well in a team setting, but also who wants to work as part of a team, not just go through the motions. A telling sign is how well the candidate can work with others who are very different from them. This will help you get a glimpse of how the candidate will work with your current employees.

Strong Writing and Communication Skills

You also should look for recent college graduates who can write well and have strong communication skills. No matter what type of job is open, the need to write and speak publicly will arise at some point. This means that your candidate must be able to put together a strong presentation that includes written material and requires them to speak in front of others.

Ability to Analyze and Solve Problems

A very important aspect of business today is the ability for employees to analyze and solve problems when they arise. Recent college graduates need to have this ability if they want to obtain employment. You need to make sure that any recent college graduates you interview can perform such a task. You can determine this by having the candidate provide an example of how they performed this task while working an internship.

Creative Out of the Box Thinker

Creativity is very important in the business world today because it separates the most successful companies from the least successful companies. As you interview recent college graduates for open positions, you need to determine if they can be creative and innovative when on the job. This will increase the success of your company because the candidate will bring their new ideas to the table each day they are on the job.

Strong Work Ethics

No matter which industry your company operates in, you will want to hire someone with strong ethics. When you bring in people who live by their ethical decisions, you will notice a difference in the office and your corporate culture.

Understanding of Numbers and Statistics

You also need to find candidates fresh out of college who understand statistics and numbers. This ability is necessary in today’s business world because it helps the company move forward with deals, projects and contracts.

Back To School! Why It Is Important To Let Employees Have Time To Continue Education

September 24th, 2014

As the rest of the country heads back to school, companies are still in session and employees are trying to find ways to beat the workday blues. Employees need to be able to continue their education these days for multiple reasons. We will discuss these reasons here so you, as a company, understands the benefits to allowing employees to return to school to further their education and career.

Employees Know They are Valued

When you allow your employees to return to school, it lets them know they are valued by the company. There are many reasons for this; the company not only lets the employee take time out of their schedule to go to school, but it also might reimburse the employee for the courses taken and the materials purchased for those courses.

Company Benefits in the Long-Run

Anytime a company sends its employees back to school, it is putting itself into an excellent position to succeed within its industry. As employees continue their education and earn higher degrees, they are bringing what they learn back with them to the office. This information can be presented to co-workers at the office during meetings or taught to others on an individual basis when necessary. This will only provide the company a stronger presence within their industry.

Builds Confidence in the Employee

When a company sends its employee back to school, it helps the employee build confidence in themselves and where their career is headed. The confidence will show when dealing with clients, completing high-quality work, offering suggestions at meetings and much more when at the office each day. This is a boost to your leadership development programs and employee succession planning efforts.

Work Becomes More Meaningful

When an employee is sent back to school by his or her employer, the work they perform when on the job becomes more meaningful to them. Going back to school can help the employee understand what he or she is doing at work much better. This will lead the employee to have more meaning in their career and what they do at the office.

Employees Become Eligible for Promotions

Companies that send their employees back to school will be helping their own cause when it comes to improving their management ranks. Employees who go back to school to earn advanced degrees will then become eligible to earn promotions at their place of employment. This helps the company promote from within and not have to look elsewhere when higher-level management positions become available.


It is important for companies to have some form of continuing education program in place in order to help employees further their career. The benefits will be present for both the company and the employees who return to school. Success will come for both parties when employees are allowed to go back to school when working.

Steps To Creating A Healthier Work Environment

September 15th, 2014

Finding new and innovative ways to create a healthier work environment can be difficult, especially when employees are stuck in bad habits for a long time. Getting your employees to buy into a healthier work environment can be tricky, but it definitely can be done effectively without causing too much of a culture shock for employees.

Here, we will discuss the most effective ways to create a healthier work environmentin just a few simple steps.

Step #1 – Fostering an Attitude of Cooperation is a Must

One of the first things you must absolutely do when creating a healthier work environment is to create an attitude of cooperation. This means that give and take must be present in the office each day of the week. Part of the cooperation discussion is offering employees ways to balance their work life and their personal life so they are not overwhelmed when they come to work each morning. This includes offering childcare, flexible work schedules, telecommuting, sabbaticals and compassionate leave.

Step #2 – Create Rewards for Employees

Employees love to be recognized or rewarded for a job well done more than once in their career. This means that you need to create some type of recognition program for your employees. This will make it easier to reward them when they complete a project ahead of the deadline, go above and beyond when dealing with a client and much more. These rewards can be gift cards to local restaurants or businesses, extra paid time off from work, a personalized plaque and much more.

Step #3 – Develop an Atmosphere of Trust

Employees also want to have a feeling of trust when they are at the office. They want to be trusted by their superiors, their co-workers and everyone else they come in contact with in the office. Trust goes both ways, which means since your employees want to be trusted, you must provide them with reasons why they can trust you. When you make this a two-way street, the environment at the workplace will be much healthier.

Step #4 – Offer Stress Busting Activities

Work is stressful, no matter how fun the workplace environment might be, which is why you need to relieve the stress of your employees as much as possible. This can be done using various activities at the office such as picnics, casual outfit days, flexible scheduling during the spring and summer months and much more.

Step #5 – Update Corporate Safety Policies

When companies look to make their workplace environment a healthier one, it can be done by updating safety policies. Safety policies will vary from company to company, but most of them are the same. If you feel that your employees are not safe in what they do at the office, you can hold safety seminars and update the policies and make sure everyone is complying when necessary.

Creating a healthier work environment does not have to a complicated process and it should be done immediately in an effort to ensure that your employees are happy and safe. Davis Staffing, a Hammond Staffing Agency can help reduce stress on your current workforce by giving you access to temp employees to take care of routine tasks, augment for larger projects, or work during peak seasons.

What Are Hiring Managers Looking For But Don’t Ask About?

September 8th, 2014

Ever wonder what is it exactly that the hiring manager is looking for, but isn’t asking during an interview? If only you had a crystal ball that could give you the rights actions and words that would inspire them to hire you on the spot, this would be a dream come true!   The truth is, each side of the interviewing table is looking for specific things from the other party. The candidate wants a great career opportunity that compensates well for the job tasks. The hiring manager is looking for the right person who has the skills, personality, and experience to get the job done. Somewhere in the middle, these areas have to fit together.   However, no hiring manager is going to say these things right out loud. It’s their job to evaluate every candidate, using legal interviewing methods and questions, to get to the bottom of what the candidate is all about. But, to get you headed in a better direction, here are some things that the hiring manager wishes he or she could say to make this go smoother:

#1 – Please arrive for your interview on time, but not too early.

A hiring manager generally never mentions this, but it is a BIG pet peeve for many when someone shows up late for an interview. Or when they show up for an interview way too early (more then 15 min) and expect immediate attention. Remember, hiring managers often have a lot of things going on, people to talk to, and they don’t have time to disrupt their schedules when you show up at the wrong time.

#2 – Thank you for taking the time and effort to dress appropriately.

If you are going to go to an interview with any hope of impressing the hiring manager, please dress for the job and the corporate culture. This means wearing business attire that is flattering to your appearance. Avoid too-tight clothes, flip flops and “stripper” shoes, jeans or cut off shorts, t-shirts with rock bands on them, and over-the-top hairstyles, makeup and perfume that walks into a room before you do.

#3 – We appreciate a well-written cover letter/resume that’s not too wordy.

Hiring managers read through thousands of cover letters and resumes every week. While they wont say it, they do prefer to talk to candidates who have concisely written documents that are to the point and use plenty of white space and bulleted lists. And spell-checked (as hiring managers are sticklers for proper grammar and spelling).

#4 – Avoid using your cell phone, texting, or checking your watch while here.

Remember, always turn your mobile device off before you walk into an interview. It’s rude to take a call or text someone while interviewing. It’s also annoying to keep glancing at your watch as if you are trying to say you have something better to do.

#5 – How does your career background relate to what this company needs?

This actually belongs at the top of the list, but once you have the interview etiquette down you can then focus on what a hiring manager wants to know. This is – how do your skills and experience translate to profitability for our business. Be sure you have some examples of how you bring a lot to the table.

#6 – Don’t give us canned interview question responses – we’ve heard them all.

Stop it with the over-practiced interview questions! Instead, try to focus on being genuine and honest in your answers. Relax some,  then try to think of ways you can illustrate your work experience and how it can benefit the company.

#7 – Are there any personal matters that may prevent you from being a good employee here?

Oh…how the average hiring manager would like to ask this question, but unfortunately it’s illegal to do so. Make it a point to talk about how you are good at managing your personal life so that it never interferes with your professional life. Hiring managers are looking for people with no drama who can handle their personal business.

#8 –  If we hire you, do you plan to stick around for the long term?

This is the question burning on every hiring manager’s mind, but they will never ask you this. Before making a decision, they will weight all the qualities of the candidates to decide who has the best chance of staying loyal to the company. Make sure you are able to see yourself in this job for at least a couple of years before going through the effort of interviewing.

Your Employees are Important – Remind Them!

August 26th, 2014

One of the most important things all managers must remember is that their employees are very important to the operational success of the business. PEOPLE are the reason the company succeeds  and they are the reason outsiders want to do business with or work for the company. Companies must remind their employees on a regular basis of how important they are to the success of the company and to its culture.

We will discuss the best methods to use when reminding employees how important they are to a company here.

Everyday Conversations Cannot be Forced

Employees know when they are involved in forced conversations with their superiors. It is very easy to spot and it can be quite uncomfortable for everyone involved. Your everyday conversations with employees must be intentional. They should never be forced. If you have to force the conversation, do not have it until you are absolutely ready to do so.

As you assign work to an employee, make sure you let them know why they are receiving this project. If it calls for a client presentation, tell them how great of a job they did on the team meeting presentation in the office last week. Let them know you have a reason behind why they are receiving specific work.

Employees Want to be Challenged

An employee will know he or she is important when they are challenged by their employer. Employees who are not challenged at work will feel a lack of importance in their job. This can lead to them slacking off or even leaving the company for greener pastures.

Instead of handing out boring, repetitive assignments to the same employee, you could give them a more challenging assignment. This will show them you have confidence in their skills and abilities to get the job done on-time and correctly.

You can show employees how important they are to the company by choosing them to train new hires. This will show them how much trust you have in them because you are relying on them to show the new hire how the company operates and what it takes to be successful.

Have Others Offer Feedback

As nice as it is to receive feedback from a direct supervisor, having this occur often could become routine. Have others from within the organization speak to your employees about how they are important to the company. This can be done by a human resource executive, the head of another department, a higher-up executive or someone from a client’s office or company.

Acknowledge the Individual

As nice as it is to recognize your employees as a team, it is also important to acknowledge the individual in your department. If an employee went above and beyond the call of duty, offer them an extra day-off from work or nominate them to attend an important conference on behalf of the department or the company.

Employees are very important to the success of a company. The more they are reminded of this, the more success the company will experience.

Can You Trust Your Candidates? Nonverbal Cues to Watch Out For

June 27th, 2014

Companies that are in the middle of filling open jobs want to complete the process fairly quickly so everyone already on the payroll can continue to perform their required duties. Sometimes, a company will cut corners to fill an open position and miss nonverbal cues of job candidates during a job interview. Not all candidates can be trusted, which is why we will discuss the nonverbal cues to pay attention to during interviews here.

Tone of Voice

One of the first things you need to watch for is the candidate’s tone of voice. This can be a little tricky because you don’t know if the their tone is changing during an interview because they are genuinely nervous or because they are trying to hide something about their past. A candidate’s tone of voice can be a trigger for other nonverbal cues such as their posture, their facial expressions and their gestures.

The Walk Around Test

An excellent way to measure a candidate’s body language or nonverbal cues is to engage him or her in the walk around test through the office. Give the candidate a tour of the facility and watch for some different cues. Take note of how quickly they smiled when meeting someone new, if they asked questions of the people they met, if they made eye contact and much more. You can even gauge the idea of them getting along with their co-workers should they be hired for the open job when doing the walk around test.

Appearance is Important Too

We are all told that appearance should not be important in life, but when it comes to acquiring a job, it is very important. If a candidate shows up to a job interview at your company in ripped pants, a stained shirt and an unshaven face, you likely will not hire that person. You would not want that person representing your company to clients and customers because it sends a bad message. Check the appearance of your candidate. Did he or she wear business attire? Did the candidate shave for the interview? Everyone makes snap judgments based on other people’s appearance. It can be a major factor in a job interview.

Lies, Lies, Lies

It is incredibly easy to spot someone who is telling a lie or a fabricated story when you are talking with them in-person. It is more difficult to accomplish this during a phone interview. Nonverbal cues such as twitching, hands shaking, sweating and fidgeting can tip an interviewer to the fact that the candidate might be telling a fib or hiding something from their past.

Take a long look at nonverbal cues presented by your job candidates during an interview to figure out if he or she is being truthful and trustworthy.

 

Management Skills: Are You a Leader or a Boss?

June 13th, 2014

It can be difficult for managers to traverse the divide between being a leader and being a boss. For some, it can be very easy to do. If you are a manager or supervisor, it does not matter how many people work under you, it is imperative that you can differentiate between being a leader and a boss. How is this done? We will discuss some of the tell-tale signs that you might be more of a boss than a leader at the workplace.

Leaders Will Lead

We know that this is very simple, but it is true. Leaders will lead their team and not rule them. This means that you will be working alongside your team instead of in front of them. You will take the time to provide the team with insight, help and show them gratitude during projects.

Leaders Do Teach

It is important for leaders to teach their employees instead of expecting they can get the job done and ignoring them in the process. The best leaders out there will have self-esteem, but will not be embarrassed to learn from employees who hold lower positions at the company. A leader will pay attention to their colleagues almost all the time, while a boss will tend to ignore colleagues and employees on a regular basis.

Bosses Establish Poor Relationships

If you are a boss, you might notice that you have very poor relationships with your employees. Leaders will develop relationships that focus on equality at the workplace. This encourages employees to be creative and to speak up when they have an idea. A boss will likely let his or her personal preferences regarding employees take over their relationships in the office.

Bosses Sit on the Sidelines

For the most part, a boss will sit on the sidelines when a project is being worked on or when meetings are taking place. Leaders have a tendency to get involved in the action and lend a helping hand whenever and wherever it is needed. Leaders will make adjustments throughout the project and offer their assistance to any employee who has a question or an issue. Bosses will stay hands-off during these projects.

Leaders Listen

One of the most important traits of a leader is that he or she will listen and then speak to employees. Bosses have a tendency to shout orders and reprimand immediately when something goes wrong. Bosses love the feeling of having all eyes and ears on them throughout the day while leaders would rather listen to their co-workers and implement their ideas when possible.
So, after reading this post, are you a leader or are you a boss? Think about your actions at work and figure out what needs to change to become a better leader. Explore important recruitment and employment topics by reading a few more popular blog posts from a leading Staffing Agency in Chicago IL Davis Staffing!

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