What’s The Timeline For A Post-Interview Follow-up?

August 7th, 2015

What's the Timeline for a Post-Interview Followup

You’ve been eagerly anticipating the job interview for weeks and now it’s over. You think things went well, but the waiting game begins. For many job seekers, this is the most painful part of the process. And it’s fairly awkward too, especially if you don’t know how and when to follow up with the recruiter on the status.

It’s natural to wonder what the next steps should be for a post-interview follow up. Here is a timeline to help for checking back in with tactfulness, but being proactive at the same time.

The Next Day

Take the time to write a thank-you note to the person (or people) you interviewed with. You can purchase a professional-looking thank-you card and jot your note inside. Keep it brief, personal, and to the point. Be sure to thank them for taking the time to meet with you to discuss the job opportunity and invite them to contact you if they have further questions or need more information. Leave your name and phone number inside. Address it to the person you met with, and drop it in the mail promptly.

One Week After the Interview

Allowing enough time for the hiring manager to check your professional references, verify your work and educational history, and evaluate you against other candidates is important. Generally, a week is enough. This is a good time to send a quick email to check on the status of the hiring process. Make it a point to offer any additional information the hiring manager needs or to track down your references if anyone is taking too long to respond.

Two Weeks After the Interview

By now, the hiring manager should have gathered all the necessary information at this stage. Now is a good time to pick up the phone and check in with the hiring manager to find out the next steps. Be polite and remind the hiring manager who you are based on something unique at the interview. You want them to have a positive impression of you. Respect their time and if they seemed rushed, let them know you will follow up in a few days.

Three Weeks After the Interview

Checking in now requires a phone call. If you don’t connect, send an email right afterwards to invite the hiring manager to get in touch with you at their convenience. You may be asked to come in for a second interview, or you may be advised that the company has not made a decision or may have cancelled the job need at this time. Be patient and remember that all good things come to those candidates who are professional.

Following up after an interview is a bit tedious, but worth the effort because it sets you apart from other candidates who don’t demonstrate interest. While you are following up, be sure to keep applying for jobs and interviewing elsewhere. Take a temporary assignment while you are seeking an answer from a company you want to work for. You may end up getting a great temp assignment that turns into a full-time, rewarding career.

Davis Staffing possesses those great Chicago jobs, whether they are full time or temporary. We have more than 40 years of experience who will provide service beyond your expectations. Contact our great team today!

Avoid These Words in a Job Interview

May 7th, 2015

Avoid These Words In A Job Interview

Job interviews are stressful situations, which almost goes without saying. But, you cannot let the stress get to you so much that you say something inappropriate that has the interviewer thinking twice about bringing you in for the interview in the first place. You must control what you say in a job interview, even if the words are ready to fly out of your mouth!

One way to ace an interview is to avoid using certain words during the interview. We will provide you with a whole host of different words that should never be used in a job interview if you want to land an offer.

Never, Ever Curse in an Interview

One of the number one things on our list is cursing. You should never, ever curse in a job interview, no matter how comfortable you are with the interviewer or how long you have known the person. Swear words might come through when interviewing internally for a job available at the company where you currently work. The reason for this is that you already know the interviewer and might even have a friendship with him or her. Avoid curse words at all costs during job interviews, or it can sink your search quickly.

Don’t Get Obsessed

‘Obsessed’ is a word that many people use to describe their passions in life, many of which are normal. Some might think that this word is not bad to say in a job interview because it explains how passionate you are about the job or the work you have performed in the past. Instead, many interviewers will raise red flags when they hear this word because they get worried  the employee might become a little too obsessed with the job or the company and begin having issues in the future. Knowing when to back off and show some balance will help you in the interview process.

No and All of Its Variations

Do your best to avoid saying the word ‘no’ in a job interview. Also, try to avoid all the variations or forms of the word no in a job interview. When you say no, or any of its variations, you are coming across as closed off to the interviewer. You will appear as if you are not open to new things or to change, should it happen after you are hired. Even if you are saying the word no in a sentence that is inherently positive, the interviewer might hear the word no and lose focus on your statement.

Whatnot and You Know

‘Whatno’t and ‘you know’ are simply filler words and phrases that are too common in the English language. However, these words do not belong in job interview conversations. They are filler words that add absolutely nothing to the conversation with the interviewer, who will see right through these words and become bored or angered at the fact that you are using these words. Interviewers, recruiters and hiring managers want to know how articulate you are in a positive way, not just how many words you can throw into a conversation.

Oh, I Just Hate

Even if you legitimately hated a task at a previous job and think that you are being lighthearted by saying so, this word will hurt your chances at landing the job. Interviewers never want to hear the word ‘hate’, and if they do, they will begin to think twice about you. Those who use the word hate in a job interview could wind up being labeled as a high risk candidate with a negative attitude.

Do your best to avoid saying any of the words and phrases mentioned above if you want to ace your next job interview. Practice your interview responses and watch out for any negative, offensive, or annoying words you may say.

The experts at Davis Staffing can help place you with some of the best companies in Chicago. Contact our team of experts today, and we will help you with any of your job needs.

What Should You Do When Preparing For An Interview?

February 19th, 2015

What-Should-You-Do-When-Preparing-For-An-Interview-

An in-person job interview can be one of the most stressful events in a person’s career. The candidate’s performance will mean the difference between a job offer and continuing to search for a new job. Preparing for a job interview is important because candidates must know about the company, have answers prepared and know what to expect from the interviewer. Check out these tips on how to prepare for a job interview:

Know Your Resume Well

A terrible mistake to make when on a job interview is not knowing your resume. If you wrote your resume years ago and failed to update it, you had better review the document so you remember what is on there. Even if you wrote a brand new resume for the job, make sure you know everything that is on it so there are no surprises. A hiring manager will ask questions about the resume’s information and expects you to go more in-depth to explain the content.

Plan an Appropriate Outfit

Make sure you plan an appropriate outfit for your job interview. If you wait until the night before, it is likely that you will not have a clean shirt or a tie that goes with your suit. Make sure your outfit fits you appropriately, that your shoes are shined and there are no stains or wrinkles on your clothes.

Practice with a Friend of Career Coach

Consider practicing the job interview with a career coach, trusted family member or friend a couple of days prior to the interview. This will help you learn how to properly greet the interviewer, answer difficult questions and what to ask of the interviewer when you are prompted.

Learn about the Company

An interviewee can sign his death sentence on an interview if he knows little to nothing about the company where he applied. All it takes is a 15-minute search of the company’s website to learn about their history, what they do, if they have won any recent awards and who some of the management team is. Just make sure that you do not ask questions simply to ask questions during the interview. This will never go well for you.

Plan the Travel Route

Do not wait until the night before the interview to plan a travel route. The minute you are scheduled for the interview, plan out your travel route. Construction can occur at a moment’s notice, roads can close due to accidents or traffic can be heavy due to rush hour. Because of these reasons, you need to have alternate routes on your travel plan so you do not arrive late to the interview.

Sleep Well Night Before

One of the most important things you can do to prepare for an interview is to get a good night’s sleep prior to the event. This will help you look alert, be fresh and have a clear mind.

Prepare for your next job interview like it is the most important thing you will ever do during your career. Preparation will make the interview easier than you think.

Davis Staffing can help you find your next job today. Contact the professional recruitment experts to find out more information!

Should You Ever Hire An Overqualified Candidate?

February 13th, 2015

Should-You-Hire-An-Overqualified-Candidate-

Companies have plenty of decisions to make when choosing a candidate for an open job. One of those decisions is whether or not to hire an overqualified candidate. Some companies will say absolutely, while others will refuse to bring an overqualified candidate on as an employee and won’t back down from that sentiment. We will discuss both sides of the argument here so your company knows how to go about making such a decision the next time it needs to hire.

Is the Candidate Actually Overqualified?

The first thing a company must determine is whether or not the candidate is actually overqualified for the position. You determine this by researching his past experience, talking to his references and bringing him in for a job interview. The candidate might be overqualified, but still wants the job because he is relocating to a new state, looking for a new work-life balance or moving into a new industry.

Does the Candidate Show Passion for the Company?

One way to determine if an overqualified candidate should be hired by your company is by his passion for the company itself. If the candidate exhibits passion for working at your company, then it might be a good idea to hire this candidate. If there is no sense of passion for your company, then he will not be a fit at your organization.

Would You Hire Same Candidate Without Their Experience?

An excellent way to figure out if an overqualified candidate is right for your company is by asking the following question:

Would you hire the candidate without his experience? This question helps the company look at other areas of the candidate, including his personality, their fit into your culture and other intangibles. Hiring a candidate for an open job should not be based solely on his resume, which is why this is an excellent question to ask of yourself during the process.

Did the Candidate Go Above-and-Beyond in Their Application?

If the candidate took the time to put together a stellar application even though he is overqualified for the job, then he might be the right person for the job. An overqualified candidate who does not follow the directions or who does not take the time to send in a stellar application will likely exhibit the same work ethic if hired for the job.

Does the Upside Outweigh the Downside?

If the upside of hiring an overqualified candidate outweighs the downside, then it is a good idea for your company. This means the candidate will work hard, want to solve problems, tackle deadlines with ease and want to help the company succeed as much as possible.

Hiring an overqualified candidate all comes down to the preference of the company looking to fill an open job. If none of the problems discussed in this post are evident, then it is a good idea.

Davis Staffing, a top staffing firm in the Chicagoland area, can help you find a job placement today. Contact us to get started!

How To Perform a Thorough Employee Background Check

January 29th, 2015

How-To-Perform-A-Thorough-Employee-Background-Check

Background checks are an excellent way for companies to weed out undesirable or dangerous candidates. Almost all companies perform background checks on candidates in order to learn more about them and their past. These checks are also great ways to avoid hiring potentially damaging employees and to prevent high employee turnover.

Here, we will discuss how to perform a thorough employee background check the legal way.

Criminal Background Checks

It is the responsibility of the employer to provide employees with a safe environment. This is done in various steps, with one of those steps being criminal background checks of all job candidates. All prospective employees should have their criminal history checked prior to being offered employment as part of the background check. The check should go back at least seven years and search for felonies and misdemeanors.

Credit History Checks

Depending on the type of job you have available, a credit history check might be a necessary part of the employee background check. For example, if you are hiring for a financial position, then a credit history check should be included. If you are interviewing a candidate for a financial planning position who does not know how to manage their money well and has bad credit, you want to know that before offering him or her employment.

I-9 Verification

Even though an applicant might say that he or she is legally allowed to work in the United States, they might be lying in order to get a job. This is why it is important to perform the I-9 verification with all employee background checks. I-9 verification is done using the Department of Homeland Security’s interface. Any red flags that come up will be sent to your company so you do not break the law in hiring someone who is not permitted to work in the United States.

Motor Vehicle Records Check

As with the credit history check, there might be a job you are trying to fill that requires a check of a candidate’s motor vehicle records. These jobs include bus drivers, truck drivers, emergency vehicle drivers and taxi drivers. A motor vehicle records check will help you determine if a candidate will be a liability in your company vehicle. This check is not limited to a job that requires driving though. They can be done by a company to determine how responsible the candidate is by having a clean record.

Employment and Education History Checks

The final aspect of a thorough employee background check involves employment and education history. Many candidates lie on their resumes and companies find out when it is too late. You can check the status of any degree they claim they earned and which schools they attended. You can also check where they have been employed in the past, for how long and what salary they earned.

As you can see, thorough background checks are vital to the success and culture of a company. Make sure yours are being done properly the next time you hire for an open position. Use a third party background check company or have the expert staffing services at Davis Staffing handle this important task before you hire the next person.

How To Negotiate During and After an Interview

December 5th, 2014

The job interview process can be stressful and daunting, but if you know how to go about it, you should have no trouble landing a new job. One of the more difficult aspects of the process is negotiating both during and after the job interview. Negotiating things like starting date, salary, benefits, and work responsibilities often takes place during this stage.

If you have never had to negotiate during an interview, this article will help you prepare for your first negotiations. If you have negotiated in the past, this article will help you hone your negotiating skills.

How to Negotiate During the Job Interview

When negotiating during the job interview, you need to use a couple of tricks in order to be successful. When asked about your current salary, do not lie, but also do not provide the exact number. Instead, provide the interviewer with a salary range you are looking for. Another good tip is to make them name a definitive number first.

You must absolutely use generalizations when negotiating during the interview. Say things like “My total compensation,” which will allow you to include 401(k), benefits, bonuses, raises, flexible spending accounts and other compensation. As mentioned earlier, provide the interviewer with a range that includes all of these items so you are not limiting yourself to just salary.

If the interviewer keeps pushing you for your current salary, finally give them an answer, but make sure you ask what their compensation and benefits package looks like so you can get a feel for the compensation being offered.

How to Negotiate After an Interview

Once the interview process is complete, it is time to wait for the call that includes a job offer. The wait can last anywhere from a couple of days to two weeks and you should use that time to put together your negotiating strategy.

When the call comes and a job is offered, thank the interviewer, but stop short of saying ‘yes’ to the offer. Ask them if you could take 48 hours to think things over and discuss it with your spouse. Ask the person on the other end of the phone how the position is funded so you can figure out what type of package will be offered.

You should always ask for the job offer in writing so you have all of the responsibilities, expectations and compensation information in one place for you to reference when negotiating.

During this part of the negotiation process you need to convey to the company what type of value you bring. Never mention to them how much you need to cover living expenses, bills and loan payments. Weigh the pros of the job against the cons, and make sure that the cons do not outweigh the pros. If this happens, then the job might not be for you.

Negotiating during and after a job interview is a very important skill to have. Make sure you know what you are looking for in the job so you can negotiate properly.

How To Ask For A Reference Or Letter Of Recommendation

November 21st, 2014

Asking for a reference or a letter of recommendation can be a stressful situation for a job seeker, especially if he or she has never done so in the past. You might not know the etiquette involved in such a request, which is why we will tackle the issue in this post. Make sure you follow the tips outlined in this article if you want to receive a glowing reference or letter of recommendation for a job application.

Put the Request in Writing

Many people who have written hundreds of letters like to receive the request in writing. The reason for this is that they are more likely to remember they were asked and have a reference guide for the letter’s information. The written request can be submitted via email or as a letter itself. In the request, make sure you include all the pertinent information about the company and the job for which you are applying so they can tie your experience and skills altogether.

Ask Early and Personally

When you know that you will be applying for a job, ask for the letter of recommendation early and personally. By early, we mean before the company even requests one. This is a good idea because you will be able to hand it in as soon as the company requests the recommendation. You should also ask personally. When you ask someone who knows you well, it makes the writing process much easier. Also try to ask them personally, which includes using a phone call or the next time you see them in person.

Ask Nicely and Professionally

One of the most important things you need to do when asking for a reference is that you must ask the person nicely. Do not talk about them owing you a favor for something you did for them years ago and never back them into a corner.

When you ask, you need to provide the person with a graceful way to bow out of the request if they so chose to do so. If they do decide to bow out of the request, never become offended or ask the person why they came to this decision.

Make it Easy

When asking someone to be a reference on your resume, you need to make it as easy as possible for them. Tell them what type of job you are looking for, and if you apply, give them a heads up so they are not surprised when they receive a phone call from a hiring manager asking about you.

Also, to make it easier on your reference, you should email them a copy of your resume. They can familiarize themselves with your resume and be able to look at it when on the phone with a hiring manager.

What To Look For In A Candidate Fresh Out Of School?

October 14th, 2014

As an employer, you need to do everything possible to find the right candidate for the open jobs at your company. This means that you will need to know what to look for in the candidates who interview for the open jobs. The student’s GPA and major are not the only thing you need to take into consideration when hiring recent college graduates.

We have compiled a list of the most important things to look for in a candidate fresh out of school here.

A Team Player

The candidate must be a team player. You will want an employee who not only can work well in a team setting, but also who wants to work as part of a team, not just go through the motions. A telling sign is how well the candidate can work with others who are very different from them. This will help you get a glimpse of how the candidate will work with your current employees.

Strong Writing and Communication Skills

You also should look for recent college graduates who can write well and have strong communication skills. No matter what type of job is open, the need to write and speak publicly will arise at some point. This means that your candidate must be able to put together a strong presentation that includes written material and requires them to speak in front of others.

Ability to Analyze and Solve Problems

A very important aspect of business today is the ability for employees to analyze and solve problems when they arise. Recent college graduates need to have this ability if they want to obtain employment. You need to make sure that any recent college graduates you interview can perform such a task. You can determine this by having the candidate provide an example of how they performed this task while working an internship.

Creative Out of the Box Thinker

Creativity is very important in the business world today because it separates the most successful companies from the least successful companies. As you interview recent college graduates for open positions, you need to determine if they can be creative and innovative when on the job. This will increase the success of your company because the candidate will bring their new ideas to the table each day they are on the job.

Strong Work Ethics

No matter which industry your company operates in, you will want to hire someone with strong ethics. When you bring in people who live by their ethical decisions, you will notice a difference in the office and your corporate culture.

Understanding of Numbers and Statistics

You also need to find candidates fresh out of college who understand statistics and numbers. This ability is necessary in today’s business world because it helps the company move forward with deals, projects and contracts.

How To Explain That You Were Fired

October 7th, 2014

It is very unlikely that you will go through your entire career without being fired at least once or twice. When this happens, you will run into the problem of answering questions about your termination when going on job interviews. But, don’t sweat it! Read on for some expert advice on how to explain you were fired, in a tactful way.

Provide a Brief Answer

One of the first things you need to do is stay brief in your answer. Some people see this negative question as a reason to provide the interviewer with a monologue that lasts five minutes. You need to prepare your answer ahead of time and practice it so you stay as brief as possible during the interview. Get right to the point with the answer so you do not begin talking negatively about your previous employer.

Be Honest in Your Answer

When you are asked about being fired, you need to be honest with the interviewer. You should not try to spin termination as being laid-off or that it was a mutual split. This will only make matters worse for you during the interview. Even though you should be honest with the interviewer, you do not need to provide him or her with every single detail of why you were fired either. This could only turn into an ugly situation for you as a candidate.

Refrain from Speaking Negatively About Your Former Employer

Another important tip here when explaining you were fired is to refrain from speaking negatively about your former employer. Interviewers will ask about being fired in order to find out why the termination occurred and how you react to your former employer. An interviewer will want to see how you handle the situation when talking about them. It will make the difference between being offered a position with the company and not receiving a second interview.

Remove Bitterness

When answering the question about being fired, you need to refrain from sounding bitter. Employers do not want to hire bitter employees, which is why you need to refrain from using language that makes you sound like a sore loser.

Do Not Blame Anyone

You were fired for a reason. This means that you cannot blame anyone else for losing your job but yourself. Since you should not talk poorly about your former employer, you also need to refrain from bad mouthing any former supervisors or co-workers at the same time.

Explain What You Have Learned

The next thing you can do when answering a question about being fired is to explain what you have learned from the situation. Part of your answer, which should still be brief, is to explain what you learned from being fired and how you can apply it to your next job.

What Are Hiring Managers Looking For But Don’t Ask About?

September 8th, 2014

Ever wonder what is it exactly that the hiring manager is looking for, but isn’t asking during an interview? If only you had a crystal ball that could give you the rights actions and words that would inspire them to hire you on the spot, this would be a dream come true!   The truth is, each side of the interviewing table is looking for specific things from the other party. The candidate wants a great career opportunity that compensates well for the job tasks. The hiring manager is looking for the right person who has the skills, personality, and experience to get the job done. Somewhere in the middle, these areas have to fit together.   However, no hiring manager is going to say these things right out loud. It’s their job to evaluate every candidate, using legal interviewing methods and questions, to get to the bottom of what the candidate is all about. But, to get you headed in a better direction, here are some things that the hiring manager wishes he or she could say to make this go smoother:

#1 – Please arrive for your interview on time, but not too early.

A hiring manager generally never mentions this, but it is a BIG pet peeve for many when someone shows up late for an interview. Or when they show up for an interview way too early (more then 15 min) and expect immediate attention. Remember, hiring managers often have a lot of things going on, people to talk to, and they don’t have time to disrupt their schedules when you show up at the wrong time.

#2 – Thank you for taking the time and effort to dress appropriately.

If you are going to go to an interview with any hope of impressing the hiring manager, please dress for the job and the corporate culture. This means wearing business attire that is flattering to your appearance. Avoid too-tight clothes, flip flops and “stripper” shoes, jeans or cut off shorts, t-shirts with rock bands on them, and over-the-top hairstyles, makeup and perfume that walks into a room before you do.

#3 – We appreciate a well-written cover letter/resume that’s not too wordy.

Hiring managers read through thousands of cover letters and resumes every week. While they wont say it, they do prefer to talk to candidates who have concisely written documents that are to the point and use plenty of white space and bulleted lists. And spell-checked (as hiring managers are sticklers for proper grammar and spelling).

#4 – Avoid using your cell phone, texting, or checking your watch while here.

Remember, always turn your mobile device off before you walk into an interview. It’s rude to take a call or text someone while interviewing. It’s also annoying to keep glancing at your watch as if you are trying to say you have something better to do.

#5 – How does your career background relate to what this company needs?

This actually belongs at the top of the list, but once you have the interview etiquette down you can then focus on what a hiring manager wants to know. This is – how do your skills and experience translate to profitability for our business. Be sure you have some examples of how you bring a lot to the table.

#6 – Don’t give us canned interview question responses – we’ve heard them all.

Stop it with the over-practiced interview questions! Instead, try to focus on being genuine and honest in your answers. Relax some,  then try to think of ways you can illustrate your work experience and how it can benefit the company.

#7 – Are there any personal matters that may prevent you from being a good employee here?

Oh…how the average hiring manager would like to ask this question, but unfortunately it’s illegal to do so. Make it a point to talk about how you are good at managing your personal life so that it never interferes with your professional life. Hiring managers are looking for people with no drama who can handle their personal business.

#8 –  If we hire you, do you plan to stick around for the long term?

This is the question burning on every hiring manager’s mind, but they will never ask you this. Before making a decision, they will weight all the qualities of the candidates to decide who has the best chance of staying loyal to the company. Make sure you are able to see yourself in this job for at least a couple of years before going through the effort of interviewing.

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